What's on The Zone @ 91-3 ::

Link

Login

No known events today.

Reliving six-decade memory of the Saanich Fair

Sep 01 2012
Garry Callander was three years old when a Daily Colonist photographer snapped his picture at the Saanich Fair. The photo appeared in the paper Sunday, Sept. 4, 1955. When a copy turned up in the insulation of an Oak Bay home, the owner decided to track down the little boy — who is now 60 and retired.¬†

Garry Callander was three years old when a Daily Colonist photographer snapped his picture at the Saanich Fair. The photo appeared in the paper Sunday, Sept. 4, 1955. When a copy turned up in the insulation of an Oak Bay home, the owner decided to track down the little boy — who is now 60 and retired.

Photograph by: Bruce Stotesbury , timescolonist.com (September 2012)

His white flour-sack pants about to fall, cattle-exhibitor Garry Callander had to enlist a judge in preventing a slip-off-the-bum.

Callander passed the cow's lead to the judge, told him to hang on for a second, and gave his pants a tug.

His mother had sewn them together using flour sacks only days before, to dress him in the then-standard cattle shower's all-white uniform. But they just weren't sitting right.

With pants back in place, a newspaper photographer just happened to stop, snapped his picture and immortalized the three-year-old boy on the front page of the Daily Colonist at what is now the Saanich Fair.

That newspaper photograph appeared Sunday, Sept. 4, 1955.

"I've always known about the picture and the story behind it," said

HEAD ON DOWN

The 145th annual Saanich Fair runs from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. today and Sunday, and 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday. The midway is open from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. today and Sunday, and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday.

The fairgrounds are at 1528 Stelly's Cross Rd. in Central Saanich.

It is Western Canada's oldest continuously running agricultural fair.

Callander, now 60 and retired.

Someone who didn't know, however, made it a mission to track down Callander after discovering a copy of the newspaper, stuffed as insulation around the window frame of an Oak Bay home.

Robert Jewsbury said he was renovating his home in Oak Bay, found the newspaper and slipped it into plastic to keep it safe. It stayed in the basement of the rental home until a few years later when he brought it to his home in Saanich.

His wife, Evelyn, made it a mission to track down the adult Callander.

"We had the paper sitting at home and my wife would look at it and say, 'I've got to track him down,' " Jewsbury said this week.

Eventually, she posted it on the Internet. Within days, Callander was informed and Jewsbury showed up at Callander's house with the newspaper.

Callander said the original photo sat for years in his parents' living room.

Both are still alive but long retired from dairy farming.

He was still surprised to receive messages from friends and family who had spotted the posting about the old newspaper.

Callander called and Jewsbury delivered.

"I've had two or three calls and a couple of emails from people who know me," Callander said.

rwatts@timescolonist.com

We thought you might also be interested in..